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November 2017 Archives

Reviewing a ward's retained rights

Many Miami residents have come us here at The Law Offices of Frye & Vazquez, P.L. after having had a loved one committed to a guardianship convinced that those parties will become the targets of financial exploitation and abuse. If you share this same concern, your fears likely rise from the assumption that when one is determined to be incapacitated, all of his or her rights and decision-making powers are essentially revoked. Yet even when one becomes the ward of a guardian, he or she does still retain basic freedoms. 

Identifying common estate tax audit triggers

If there is a common concern that the many clients that we here at The Law Offices of Frye & Vazquez, P.L. have helped to prepare estate tax returns in Miami share, it is the fear of being audited. You know how stressful if can be to prepare your own individual income tax returns every year. Imagine the added pressure that can come with the Internal Revenue Service asking you to justify what you file. Your annual income may not approach the minimum estate tax return filing threshold ($5.49 million for 2017), so your concerns over having to provide a detailed account of all of those assets is certainly justified. 

What happens if you die without a will?

If you are a Florida resident who has not yet made a will, you probably will be shocked to discover that the state of Florida has made one for you – sort of. The Florida Bar explains that if you die without having made a will, you are considered to have died intestate and your probate assets will be distributed according to Florida law.

How can I keep my loved ones from fighting over my estate?

Like other Miami residents, you only want the best for your loved ones. This includes preserving family harmony after you have passed on. It is only natural to hope the future generations of your family will get along and be close long after you are gone.

Late singer's sons feud over family trust

Ask anyone in Miami that is currently involved in his or her own estate planning, and he or she will likely say that the main motivation for doing so is to avoid the potential for disputes arising between his or her beneficiaries. Yet oftentimes, people that have interest in an estate may easily believe that the actions of others who are also party to it may have a negative impact on said interest. The hope is that when such disputes arise, beneficiaries can sit down with each other (or the trustees or executors involved in their cases) and work things out amicably. Sadly, that does not always happen. 

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